String-of-10


by Susan Tepper

Lexi Lerner

Alexis Hope Lerner is a violinist, composer, and biology nerd from New Jersey. A student at the Manhattan School of Music, she has been a prizewinner in multiple national and international competitions. When Lexi is not practicing or composing, she can be found in her high school’s Environmental Science Center (where she hangs out with the turtles) or watching movies with her cat Marie Antoinette. Lexi dreams of becoming a virologist, a film composer, an explorer, or some wonderful combination of all three. Next year, she will be attending Brown University as part of the 8-year Program for Liberal Medical Education.

Foreigner
by Alexis Lerner

Twenty feet from the left entrance of the Port Authority was where the man called home.

Around him was a semicircular buffer zone enclosed in broken bottles, shielding him from Manhattan’s noisy sea of taxis and commuters.

In his coat pocket: a blunt razor, half a comb and 87¢. No cardboard sign. He didn’t want pity.

He was more a grizzly bear than a man. A mother of four walked by–a swan with trailing cygnets. She huddled them into her arms’ nest. -Don’t get too close, children, or he might bite.

Through cataract-riddled eyes, the man saw the smallest break from the group and skip towards him through the snow. A six-year-old princess with Mary Janes and a mink hat. She accidentally kicked over a bottle.

“Excusez-moi. Voulez-vous un ami?”

Is she talking to me?- He grimaced, sinking deeper into himself. Only his bulbous nose and coarse beard showed between his hat and scarf.

She smelled like sugar cookies. Warmth. Safety. Protected by youth, innocence and socioeconomic status.

He hated her.

He heard a zipper; then the mother’s boots quickly clacking against the sidewalk. She snatched her daughter’s hand, hissing in a foreign tongue as they retreated.

The man lifted his gaze. In the child’s open knapsack was a teddy bear just as grizzly as he was–beady eyes yearning, disappointed.

He sighed and looked up past the Port Authority overhang, past the Times Square skyscrapers, and into the endless grey space, hoping to see some ultimate good there.

 ***

Susan Tepper: Your story takes place outside of a somewhat controversial NYC landmark. How do you feel when you enter it, or walk by it?

Alexis Hope Lerner: On Wednesdays, I intern at a recording studio in the city; to get there, I take a bus in from New Jersey to the Port Authority. Usually I have my headphones on and am planning out the long work day ahead as I go down all of the escalators and pass the various shops and cafes on the first floor: Starbucks, Au Bon Pain, Hudson News, etc. The Port Authority entrance is almost completely glass, and what I see – every week, without fail – rocks me from my complacent state. People with untrimmed beards and dirty faces, wrapped up in wooly, musty blankets, create little islands for themselves on the thick sidewalk in front of the building. To me, it is astounding how many commuters – including myself – look past them as if they were part of the urban landscape itself. It is unfortunately too common a sight in the city – especially at the Port Authority – to see the homeless in public places in broad daylight. We become numb to what is around us, and that is what I am most afraid of. The distraction of daily life allows us to look past the hunger and pain that is often right before our eyes.

ST:  In a surreal sense, the homeless, the grifters, the addicts that populate the area around Port Authority are ‘foreigners’ as compared with the lives of the day-to-day people who use the terminal strictly for transit.  Interestingly, you have given real ’foreigners’ entry into this story.  Why not just some average Americans?

AHL: I agree with you in that the homeless are certainly “foreigners” within the Port Authority environment. But the other foreigners there are not the people whom we might expect. The fact that the French family is not native to the area does not necessarily render them “foreign” to the Manhattan sentiment towards the homeless. Actually, the only true outlier in the story – at least to me –  is the little girl, and that is for reasons other than her nationality. The point is that callousness towards the homeless is an international epidemic. Even the people we would expect to be foreigners in this story’s microenvironment – those who live across the world from the Port Authority – fit in all too well.

ST:  All too true. Did you know ahead of time that you would make them French (or other than Americans), or did this just strike you as you moved along the keyboard (or paper) writing?

AHL: I always knew there should be a language barrier between the little girl and the vagrant because I wanted her intentions and character to be clear beyond her words. The idea of making the family French, specifically, struck me as I was writing; it stemmed from the fact that our perception of French culture is often tagged with a romanticized view of its “poshness”. Consider how we view Coco Chanel, Christian Dior and Louis Vuitton… or even how we idealize the concept of being a “starving artist” in a beautiful Parisian flat, eating baguettes and sipping on hot cocoa in cafes and boutiques.

ST:  As in the famous opera La Boheme.  Which didn’t end well either.

AHL:  There is a certain sense of unattainable charm and glamour associated with French culture, which many Americans covet. But when I visited Paris six years ago, I saw firsthand a surprising number of homeless men and women sitting on steps outside of bakeries and museums. Even if Paris is the “city of love”, it is not exempt from the cruelties of reality. That realization affected me deeply and was integral to this story. Although the vagrant views the family as swan-like and elite, the mother’s ugly feathers show when she huddles her children away from him and turns a cold shoulder – a behavior that breaks our romanticized view of foreign culture. Even the most posh and beautiful of us can be ugly on the inside.

____________

Susan-Tepper200w

Susan Tepper has authored 5 published books. The latest is a novel in stories called The Merrill Diaries, from Pure Slush Books. She is a named finalist in storySouth Million Writers Award for 2013, was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in fiction (2010), and nine times for the Pushcart Prize. Tepper is a staff editor at Flash Fiction Chronicles where she conducts the interview series UNCOV/rd.  www.susantepper.com

by Aliza Greenblatt

JC Towler

J.C. Towler, the second place winner in our String-of-10 contest, is in the market for a gently used Time-Turner or Transmorgifier. He has been an editor at Every Day Fiction since 2010, but wears more hats than you could possibly be interested in knowing about.

 

Private Lessons
by John Towler

 Orderlies barged through the entrance of triage, dropping their litter on the table with an unceremonious bump.  The wounded soldier reeked of the battlefield, burnt gunpowder and mud.  Her left arm dangled like a pendulum in decline, blood running down fingers traced chaotic patterns on the once white floor.

I performed a rapid assessment of her injuries, as Costas snipped away uniform remnants.

“You safe now…” He paused over her name tag.  “Private Gomez.  Estás seguro.”

He hooked her to a cardiac monitor then brushed a few strands of hair from of her staring, unresponsive eyes.

Dr. Kerns marched in, razor creases and polished shoes rivaling any rear echelon four-star.  A stateside doctor on voluntary rotation, he’d tried to join every branch of the service but kept getting four-f-ed over because of mole-like eyesight.

“Report.”

“Two thoracic GSW’s, through and through. Bilateral pneumothorax.  BP’s dropping.”

Kerns peered down at chest of the dying soldier through Coke-bottle glasses.  His nose crinkled in disdain.

“Those are exit wounds.”

“Apparently.”

“Running from the fight, no doubt.”  He poked at the injuries.  “She’s done. Save the effort for someone deserving.”

“Sir, this soldier has a rhythm.”

He grabbed her chart began writing.

“Injuries incompatible with life,” he said.

Orderlies returning with another wounded soldier interrupted my possibly career-ending reply.  A platoon sergeant followed behind.

“Gomez in here?” he asked.  I nodded.

“Do your best for her,” he said.  He jerked a thumb at the wounded man.  “She was carrying him.”

***

Aliza Greenblatt: Congratulations on placing in the String-of-Ten Contest! Can you tell us a little about how this story evolved? What were some of the challenges of writing a 250 word story?

JC Towler: My brother, Blake, just retired from a military career (24 years in the Navy and Army).  One of his assignments had him flying medevac choppers on a tour in Iraq 2.0 and he’s a real hero.  So the military was on my mind. I work with several women in my primary job (law enforcement) and while things have come a long way, there are still a few social Neanderthals – like Dr. Kerns in the story – who have some reservations about women in “men’s jobs”. It all coalesced into the theme and plot of Private Lessons.

Flash is a challenge because you’ve got to incorporate all those elements common to any sort of creative writing that make a reader want to spend time with your words. A 250 word story is just four times more challenging to write than a 1000 word story.

AG: You’ve been an editor for EDF for several years as well as a dedicated fiction writer. What do you think is the key to writing an effective flash piece?

JCT: Be interesting. Your title must be interesting.  Your opening sentence must be interesting. Your characters must be interesting.  As long as the reader is interested, they’ll stick with your story short of an unexpected natural disaster in their immediate vicinity. But even if their reading is interrupted by a natural disaster, your story should be so interesting that, as soon as they pull themselves from the rubble or find high ground to escape the rising flood waters, they should get back to turning pages.

AG: What I find interesting about this story is there’s a pivotal moment where several characters’ life courses are going to be decided. One is obviously Private Gomez and the others are the doctor and the narrator whose decisions could be career shattering. Being that you didn’t have a lot of time (in terms of word count) to build the story, was it a challenge to find the correct balance of tension and information to bring that moment to life?

JCT: Yes. First draft: 517 words.

The narrator wound up losing the most time in the story, but in some ways the loss became a gain. Less defined (to the point where even the gender is a bit ambiguous) the narrator is more of a shell that the reader fills in with their own personality. It’s like telling a story in the 2nd person without the force-fed “you” point of view. It’d be hard to do with a longer piece, but with flash it worked okay.

AG: There is the theme in this story of the people who seem to have honor and the people who actually do. The doctor should – and appears to have it – but it’s the nameless narrator and the private who make the honorable choices. Do you think the doctor will change from this experience? Will the narrator?

JCT: For the doctor, probably not. There are a certain people in this world whose egos will not allow them to accept personal error or admit to bad judgement and a large percentage of that group are represented by politicians, Fox News Personalities, and surgeons.

I hope the narrator would be more assertive the next time something like this happens, but as a subordinate to the doctor in both military rank and in the operating room hierarchy, it would be tough. Laws protecting whistleblowers are completely inadequate and in reality when somebody is faced with “doing the right thing” the “right thing” takes a back seat to career, family, and reputation.

AG: I’m always curious what drives writers to become writers. Why do you tell stories? What keeps you writing? What type of stories do you prefer to write?

JCT: I’m principally a fantasy and science fiction guy (which is odd in that both times I’ve placed in the String-of-Ten contest, neither piece has been in that genre). Honestly, my writing has taken a back seat to work, family and my second job as a videographer.  I’m very visually and sound-oriented, to the point that when I write I have to remind myself “Don’t forget the other three senses” and video work appeals to me because those are the primary mediums of expression.  (My latest effort is about the rescue and rehabilitation of a hummingbird.  You can watch it here:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3jTyU_P0n4o)

AG: Thanks for taking the time to talk with us.

JCT: Thanks for the questions.

__________________

 Aliza profile-pic-2Aliza T. Greenblatt works in a firmly non-writing field when the sun is up and writes under a desk lamp at night.   Fueled by a sheer love of books and a tyrannical imagination, she writes the stories that appear over her morning coffee and won’t leave her alone until they are put down on paper. She writes, raves, and blogs at http://atgreenblatt.com. and on Twitter @AtGreenblatt.

by Gay Degani

Caroline Hall, Winner of String-of-Ten 6Caroline Hall, this year’s String-of-Ten Six First Place Winner with her story, “Snowman Suicide,” was raised by English majors during the Nintendo generation. Now a teacher-on-hiatus, she has attended ten schools and worked at seven. She is a compulsive hiker and a New Englander who says “wicked awesome” and used the same window fan until it caught fire.  She writes short stories and flash fiction.

[NOTE: The story appears today at Every Day Fiction.]

Gay Degani: I’d love to know what your first reaction was to the list of words: LITTER-ENTRANCE-SAFE-SPIRITUAL -SPOTLIGHT-BOOKMARK-CATASTROPHE-RAZOR-FAULTY-ULTIMATE and the aphorism: “I prefer the errors of enthusiasm to the indifference of wisdom,” from Anatole France.  How did you approach the prompt?

Caroline Hall: My immediate response was that a number of the words on the list–razor, faulty, ultimate, and catastrophe—seemed to cluster together naturally.  To my mind, they grew organically from the concepts of depression and suicide.  I also knew I wanted to use the word “spiritual” because I love it!

When I looked at the list, the word “razor” practically glowed. A few years ago, I had surgery for a bizarre and not-so-threatening cancer.  After I was declared “fine,” I got strangely depressed.  I spent a lot of time in doctors’ and therapists’ waiting rooms that year.  I wrote a poem about waiting rooms and the endless string of medical appointments.  In the poem, I described patients with eyes like pills and mouths like razor blades.  Forty or fifty drafts later, the poem still didn’t work.  But when I saw the word “razor” on the list of words for the String-of-10 competition, I knew the setting and mood of “Snowman Suicide” instantly.  I was glad to get the chance to resuscitate the image and pleased that the story was much better than the original poem.

For me, writing “Snowman Suicide” was about balancing passive and active.  As a patient, you spend a great deal of time passively waiting, and I wanted to capture that feeling.  But I’ve also met a lot of people who fight back against their illnesses and circumstances with spunk and humor.  I wanted to make sure that some of their creativity, intelligence, and strength appeared in the story.

GD: You mentioned your goals for this story included balancing passive and active, so what other elements do you keep in mind when you are working on a piece of writing?  Characters you’ve touched on, what about structure and theme?  What do you handle these?

CH: My successful stories usually begin with an object—in this case, a snowman.  Characters start out being me and evolve as they interact with the object.  They develop slowly, which makes for some embarrassing drafts.  But getting to know and—sometimes— slowly fall in love with my characters is a joy.  Sometimes, it surprises me which characters I fall in love with and how big an impact they have on my life. Workshops and readers are helpful for clarifying the conflict in stories, for finding spots that don’t make sense or feel true.

I studied English and am a closet Classics geek, and my tendency was—and still is—to write Latinate or Victorian-style prose.  My first stories were designed to be analyzed rather than read. Finally, I realized that I could have a vital message, but that didn’t matter if readers needed a pot of coffee to survive the first paragraph.

As a result, I work hard at paring stories down to their cores.  I started writing flash fiction by accident; flash fit the funny clumps of time I squirreled away for writing better than longer stories did.   It was a happy accident.  Forcing myself to adhere to strict word limits has made my sentences stronger and leaner.

GD: You mention “paring down.”  I’m wondering what you look for when you edit your work.  What are your go-to moves?

CH: I spent a few years writing terrible poetry, so my main rule is “if it sounds the way your poetry sounded, it needs to go!” I love alliteration and repetition, but I have to make sure they don’t hijack the story or become distracting.  I’ll turn clauses into phrases.  In early drafts, I tend to stack adjectives and details.  I’ll have three or four when I need one.  In the first paragraph, my snowman initially went through five different diagnoses; three was enough.

GD: As I said in my interview with Jim Harrington, what drew me to this story, was a lot of things: “The title, the first line, the humor, the surprise, its clarity. ‘Snowman Suicide,’ who wouldn’t want to read that story?”  All this makes me want to read more of your work.  Can you tell me where to find other stories of yours and what you are working on now?

CH: “Snowman Suicide” is my first published work.  I wouldn’t have it any other way.  Earlier, I mentioned that my friends from the mental health community—if you can call it that—inspire me constantly with their intelligence, wit, candor, and kindness.  I am proud, grateful, and honored to know them and to have a chance to represent them in this story.  I hope I’ve done them justice.

 

gay 2Gay Degani has published fiction on-line and in print including her short collection, Pomegranate Stories. She is founder of EDF’s Flash Fiction Chronicles, a staff editor at Smokelong Quarterly, and blogs at Words in Place. She’s had three stories nominated for Pushcart consideration and won the 11th Annual Glass Woman Prize. Her linked-story novella is part of Pure Slush’s 2014- A Year in Stories anthology and her her serialized novel, What Came Before, is currently online at Every Day Novels.

string-of-10-6logo Congratulations to CAROLINE HALL, whose story, “Snowman Suicide,” was selected by Guest Judge Gay Degani as the FIRST PLACE WINNER of the String-of-10 SIX Flash Fiction Contest.

“Private Lessons” by John Towler and “Foreigner” by Alexis Lerner placed second and third, respectively.  “The Maybe Baby” by Alison McBain was selected by the FFC staff as this year’s Patricia McFarland Memorial Prize winner.

The first place story will appear at Every Day Fiction in early April, accompanied by an author interview at Flash Fiction Chronicles on the same day. The other winning stories will appear at Flash Fiction Chronicles in subsequent weeks, along with author interviews. Winning authors will be contacted by members of the FFC staff shortly to distribute the prizes and begin the interview process.

Below is a complete list of winners and finalists (in alphabetical order by title).

Winners

1st Place: “Snowman Suicide” by Caroline Hall
2nd Place: “Private Lessons” by John Towler
3rd Place: “Foreigner” by Alexis Lerner
Patricia McFarland Memorial Prize: “The Maybe Baby” by Alison McBain

Honorable Mention

“Doge Coefficient” by Stewart C. Baker
“Pa Don’t Like Kittens” by Lindsay Fisher
“SuperMegaMan” by Elizabeth Wright

Other Finalists

“Amor Fati” by Jesi Bender
“Blueberry Bookmark” by Russell Scarola
“Catastrophe at Blossburg No. 1” by Matthew Barbour
“Michael” by Kurt Newton
“October Visit to the Three-Legged Fox” by Deirdre Gregg
“The Ultimate Delusion” by Ginna Wilkerson
“Wormwood” by John Mannone

Thanks to everyone who participated in this year’s contest. We at FFC are already looking forward to next year’s event.

Q&A With Gay

Gay Degani

Jim Harrington: You organized this contest and ran it for five years. How was the experience different this year being the final judge?

Gay Degani: I’ve always looked forward to this contest, interesting to see how writers handle the string of ten prompt words and exciting when the judging is over to see who won, since we read blind!! However, I have to admit, reading only the finalists as guest judge is a lot easier than reading every entry!

JH: I suppose this is backwards. My first question should have been how did you come up with the idea for the String-of-10 contest in the first place? How long do you see it running?

GD: When I took on the responsibility for Every Day Fiction’s blog, I thought it would be a place for writers to discuss their work, ask advice, and offer help, and I’d monitor it like a forum. It didn’t take me long to realize no one was using it and I began to write articles and solicit from others. This worked better, but our following was small. I got the “I want more clicks” bug since we were offering good stuff. A free contest seemed like the best way to do that. That first year, I held one in February and one in October—I may have those dates wrong—but it was too much work. I decided to stick with the once a year model.

JH: The String-of-10 stories are limited to 250 words or fewer. What do you look for in these short-short-shorts? Are your expectations different than with say a 750-1000 word piece?

GD: My expectations don’t revolve around length, they revolve around story, character, and language, though I hate to put it that way because people always think PLOT in the conventional basic-action way. “Story” doesn’t have to contain huge change or flashy events, but it needs to have meaning through realization, impression, thought. The characters don’t need full-on description, but must feel real, and this is done through deftly placed details and meaningful dialogue. The language must be clear and spare with every word necessary in some way. But then, these elements are valued whether a story is 25 words or 25,000, aren’t they?

JH: In general, what stood out about this year’s winning story? Of course, we don’t want to give away too much. :)

GD: Many things drew me to this story. The title, the first line, the humor, the surprise, its clarity. “Snowman Suicide,” who wouldn’t want to read that story, a title so rich? The idea that a snowman could commit suicide is appealing. As a reader, I wondered how and why this might happen. Not by the sun, I hoped. Then the juxtaposition of the two words appeals. Snowmen are associated with children, fun, smiles with corncob pipes, but suicide is serious and sad. I also liked the resonance of the double “s.” The title is filled with promise of something different, something surprising, and then the first line delivered, “Joe and I get out of the psych ward the same day.” It told me this writer knows her story and I felt I wouldn’t be let down. I wasn’t.

JH: You liked all of our finalist stories this year, but felt a couple were missing something to make them stand out. Could you expand on this?

GD: Some stories had terrific concepts, but the execution needed more thought while others were well written, but contained intriguing characters caught in expected plots. The other problem is often clarity. While language can and should be original, the thread of meaning should not be completely lost in imagery. Readers need some kind of anchor to hold them to a piece of writing, and while the balance between language, structure, and character doesn’t need to be equal, one of those elements has to be so strong, a reader is willing to read the piece more than once if they don’t comprehend the whole meaning the first time through.

JH: What advice would you like to pass on to those submitting a story to next year’s contest—or any contest, for that matter?

GD: Contests are a great way to get work done because of the deadline, hone craft because of the competition, and get recognition if you are long- or shortlisted, an honorable mention, a semi-finalist, a finalist, or the BIG WINNER. Here’s what I’ve learned.

  • Read the guidelines thoroughly and understand what the sponsors of the contest are asking you to do.
  • Start early. Even if all you do is brainstorm in a kind of trance, do it. Almost all dashed off entries will fail to move forward no matter how much confidence you feel when you click the send button.
  • Force yourself to write a full draft as quickly as you can to see what kind of juice is in your idea. See where it takes you and give yourself time to mull over possibilities.
  • Realize that in a contest like the String-of-10 which uses a prompt, many other entrants will have the exact first thoughts about the prompt as you do. Explore the words. Find out all their different meanings and usages. Be original. Surprise yourself and the judges.
  • The old saw is “Writing is rewriting,” and that is the very best advice I have to give. Rewrite and reedit your work. This is difficult when you are very new (and later too) because of that first excitement of “the idea” and all those “new word combinations” that show up. But you can do better. You can find stronger active verbs. You can use adjectives instead of prepositional phrases. You can search for the most perfectly matched word for the image in your head.
  • Get someone else to read it. Believe in their comments. Don’t believe in their solutions. First readers point out where there might be a problem. Consider what tripped them up but only you can figure out the best solution.
  • Proof-read. If a story is totally wonderful and you’ve misspelled a word, most judges will overlook it because it happens, but if there are numerous errors in spelling, punctuation, and grammar that don’t serve the story in some way, it will be passed over. It’s like showing up at your own wedding in your pjs because you were too lazy.

JH: If I were to look into my crystal ball, what would I see in Gay Degani’s future?

GD: Every Day Novels released my serialized suspense novel on March 3! I feel like Charles Dickens! What Came Before is the story of Abbie Palmer, who gets embroiled in the murder of a woman who might be her half-sister. It’s told in seventy 1000-word chapters. I’m also finishing up a collection of short stories, mostly flash, but a few longer pieces too. I’m still an editor at Smokelong Quarterly and an active member of the wonder online writing community.

string-of-10-6logo

The contest runs from January 28, at 12:01 PST to February 4, at 11:59 PST. The winning entry will be the best 250 (or fewer)-word story written from a randomly selected string of ten words.

GUEST JUDGE

Gay DeganiI am pleased to announce that this year’s Guest Judge will be Gay Degani. Gay has published online and in print including her short collection, Pomegranate Stories. She is founder of EDF’s Flash Fiction Chronicles, a staff editor at Smokelong Quarterly, and blogs at Words in Place where lists of her fiction and essays on writing can be found. She’s had three stories nominated for Pushcart consideration and won the 11th Annual Glass Woman Prize. Her novel, What Came Before, will be available in early 2014.

 

GUIDELINES (Please read carefully)

The contest is open for eight days only. Anyone may enter. All entries must be in English and submitted through our Submission Manager (link below). Our regular daily prompts will be suspended for the length of the contest.

FURTHER DETAILS

  • The prompt for String-of-10 SIX will be available at 12:01 on Tuesday, January  28, 2014 here at FFC. (PLEASE NOTE: There is a limit on the number of entries we can accept.)
  • There is no entry fee.
  • Submit stories up to 250 words. The title is not counted in the 250 words.
  • Submit only one story per author.
  • DO NOT include a byline with the story.
  • All stories must contain at least four words from the String-of-10.
  • You can use any tense of the words and any recognizable form.  For example, if the word  is “jar,” “jarring” and “jar-like” qualify, while “jargon” does not.
  • You can use a prompt word in the title.
  • Seamless integration of any four of the prompt words is the goal.
  • The quotation is given for thematic inspiration, but is not required to be part of the story.
  • As we have the past two contests, we will give out a special prize, The Patricia McFarland Memorial Prize, for the story that best incorporates the theme. Any submitted story is eligible for this prize, including the first, second, and third place winners.
  • Entries must be received by 11:59 PST Wednesday, February 4.
  • All decisions made by the FFC staff and our guest judge are final.

 

CONTEST SCHEDULE

  • 1/28-2/4 Contest submissions accepted
  • 2/12 Finalist selections completed
  • 2/21 Winners chosen
  • 3/9 Winners announced at Flash Fiction Chronicles
  • 4/8 Winning story posted at EDF–Author interview posted at FFC
  • 4/15 Second place story and interview published at FFC
  • 4/22 Third place story and interview published at FFC
  • 4/29 Patricia McFarland winning story and interview published at FFC
(With the exception of the submission dates, the schedule may change without notice.)

 

 STRING-OF-10 SIX FLASH FICTION CONTEST PRIZES

1st Place: Winner will have his or her story published at Every Day Fiction and be paid the standard payment of $3.00.  In addition, the winner will receive a $50 Cash Prize from Flash Fiction Chronicles, a choice from Every Day Publishing’s Book List, and a copy of What Came Before by Gay Degani.

2nd Place: Winner will have his or her story published at Flash Fiction Chronicles in April. (There is no payment for publication at Flash Fiction Chronicles). A $20.00 cash prize will be awarded as well as a copy of Pomegranate Stories and What Came Before, both by Gay Degani, Managing Editor Emeritus of Flash Fiction Chronicles.

3rd Place: Winner will have his or her story published at Flash Fiction Chronicles in April. (There is no payment for publication at Flash Fiction Chronicles). A $20.00 cash prize will be awarded, as well as a copy of What Came Before by Gay Degani.

The Patricia McFarland Memorial Prize: Winner will have his or her story published at Flash Fiction Chronicles in April.  (There is no payment for publication at Flash Fiction Chronicles) and will receive a cash prize of $25.00

 

STRING-OF-10 SIX PROMPT

 

LITTER-ENTRANCE-SAFE-SPIRITUAL -SPOTLIGHT-BOOKMARK-CATASTROPHE-RAZOR-FAULTY-ULTIMATE

I prefer the errors of enthusiasm to the indifference of wisdom. -Anatole France

SUBMIT TO STRING-OF-10 SIX

We wish you all good writing and good luck.

Jim Harrington
Managing Editor
Flash Fiction Chronicles
jpharrin@gmail.com

 

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