Entries tagged with “Kathy Fish”.


linda simoni-Wasilaby Kathy Fish

 

Linda Simoni-Wastila was the first-place winner in FFC’s 2013 String of 10 Contest, with her story “After the Tsunami”.  The challenge was to use four of the ten prompt words in a 250 or fewer word story.  The word choices were: EVENING – QUARRY – ACCENT – ROSE – TEAR – MINUTE –GRAVE – CLOSE – ENTRANCE – BOW.  An aphorism was provided for inspiration, but not necessarily to be used in the story.  This contest offered, “I want to put a ding in the universe” – Steve Job.

 To find out more about the contest, go to the String-of-10 FIVE Guidelines.  (http://www.everydayfiction.com/flashfictionblog/string-of-10-five-starts-feb-3/)

Linda Simoni-Wastila writes from Baltimore, where she also professes, mothers, and gives a damn. You can find her stuff at Smokelong Quarterly, Monkeybicycle, Scissors and Spackle, MiCrow, The Sun, Blue Five Notebook, The Poet’s Market 2013, Hoot, Connotation Press, Baker’s Dozen, Camroc Press Review, Right Hand Pointing, Every Day Fiction, and Nanoism, among others. Senior Fiction Editor at JMWW, she slogs one word at a time towards her MA in Creative Writing at Johns Hopkins and two novels-in-progress. In between sentences, when she can’t sleep, she blogs at http://linda-leftbrainwrite.blogspot.

Linda’s first-place story will be published in early May at Every Day Fiction. Following is her interview with String-of-10 guest judge, Kathy Fish.

Kathy Fish:  Linda, first I’d like to say again how much I admire this story. You have written a resonant and beautiful story within a very tight word limit. I came away feeling so much emotion. Please share how you came to write this story. I’m particularly interested in knowing whether you had any direct or indirect experience with Japan, its culture, the tsunami, Japanese fighter pilots, etc. to draw upon in writing it. 

Linda Wastila:  Thank you Kathy. Your words mean a lot to me, coming from the Reigning Queen of Small Fictions!

The idea for this story originated in April 2011, a few days after the earthquake and its evil spawn the tsunami hit Japan. Like the rest of the world, I felt stunned, helpless, and hopeless watching the news stream on the television. A particular image of one of the nuclear reactors, which correspondents were concerned was about to blow, horrified me: black sooty smoke churning from the bottom of reactor and at the top, a man in fire gear holding a hose. I remember thinking, how futile, how brave. I wondered what kind of person could find the courage needed to try to cool down such a massive mess. I keep a lot of notebooks, including one filled with remnants of sentences, thoughts, images—it is my go-to book for ideas. So I wrote that day: “The smoky cloud obscures the setting sun. Two days ago, when the authorities called for all men to report to the reactor, I wanted to run away.” These lines jumpstarted the story.

I have never traveled to Japan, though I have always wanted to. The island and its people fascinate me, especially history involving World War II. I drew on my long-standing interest in that war to help flesh out the story. The research for this story probably took as long as the actual writing and revision.

KF:  In your opening sentence you compare the coiled hose to a “fat serpent.” Please share your intent, as writer, opening with such a powerful image in connection with the narrator’s efforts to “be a savior for Japan.”

LW:  I think I got lucky on that first sentence—it did not change during revision. This was how I imagined this character in my mind, based largely on that photographic image: standing on the precipice on the reactor, swallowed in smoke, holding a hose fat with life-saving water.

That said, I am fascinated with the symbolism of serpents, the good-evil paradox of this animal. And that sort of plays into the ethical dilemma of the character having to define his own personal honor, and the flip side of his choice. So I guess there is something to be said about stuff from the subconscious bubbling up during the writing.

KF:  The final paragraph is stunning. I appreciate the simplicity and power of the last sentence. The reader is left reflecting on the meaning of honor for the narrator, how he must feel a need to restore honor to his family after his grandfather’s failure to hurl himself to his death in the war by hurling himself to his own eventual death. You handle this very delicately. Can you talk a little about how it was writing that final paragraph. Did you have to grapple with conveying the emotion? The restraint there feels so natural and effortless. 

LW:  Wow, thank you. In writing such small pieces, I often find summing up the story through image and detail lends it more emotional impact. The simple act of repetition—the hose, the wife’s hands cradling the tea cup, the withered flowers—helps heighten emotional tension, gives the story resonance. That said, I spent more time writing and rewriting the last two sentences than the entire rest of the story. With the ending, I was aiming for a small punch in the gut, aiming for the reader to feel the character’s horrific dilemma.

KF:  Absolutely agree, regarding powerful images. And you really delivered on that punch in the gut, Linda. I felt it. Okay, lastly, could you share any advice or tips or new writers?

LW:  Keep a notebook of ideas, thoughts, snippets of dialogue, images. When reviewing, they can spark all sorts of stories, a sort of portable prompt book. There are some who subscribe to the idea that in flash fiction, there is not a lot of room to develop character, so many flash stories are more plot-based. I believe finding a way to form a character in short stories through characteristics and traits (rather than description of hair, body type, etc) provides emotional resonance to small fictions. The devil is in the telling details. And titles are so important. They carry a lot of weight in small works. The title has to do double, even triple duty, in setting time, place, tone.

KF: Terrific advice! Thanks so much for your time and for writing such an amazing story, Linda.

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Flash fiction pioneer, Kathy Fish, was guest judge this year for the String-of-10 Contest. Kathy’s short fiction has appeared in Indiana Review, The Denver Quarterly, New South, Quick Fiction, Guernica, Slice and elsewhere. She was the guest editor of Dzanc Books’ Best of the Web 2010.  She is the author of three collections of short fiction: a chapbook of flash fiction in the chapbook collective, A Peculiar Feeling of Restlessness: Four Chapbooks of Short Short Fiction by Four Women (Rose Metal Press, 2008), Wild Life (Matter Press, 2011) and Together We Can Bury It, the 2nd printing of which is forthcoming from The Lit Pub.

Karen Nelson Outdoorby Karen Nelson

Spring came in like a lion – at least at FFC – with lots of changes and exciting news!

We bid “bon voyage” to Editor Emeritus, Gay Degani, as she cruises on to spend more time with her writing (don’t worry, we’ll be seeing her in special cameo appearances to come), and we welcomed two new staff members:  Yours Truly as Technical Editor, and Andree Robinson-Neal as staff writer.

The big news for flash fiction fans was the announcement of the String-of-10 Contest winners!  Congratulations go out to Linda Simoni-Wastila, Robert Vaughan, Folly Blaine, Stephen Ramey, and the other finalists – with a huge thanks to Kathy Fish for guest judging!  The fifth installment of the competition saw more participants than ever, and the coming year promises to be an inspiring one.

Flash Fiction Chronicles has a way of getting people to talk, and we enjoyed getting to know the talents of industry writers, editors, and publishers.  Rohini Gupta advised us on The Best Way to Get Ideas (hint: do nothing), while  Matt Potter of Pure Slush shared his quirky themed anthologies.

Susan Tepper gave us insight on how her many jobs prior to studying writing have culminated in four novels.

In the 80’s I was singing with any band who’d have me.  I did rock, country, folk, pop, you name it.  Well, not blues.  I couldn’t get a handle on blues music though I love it intensely.  I think all the arts intertwine and are feeders for each other.  I loved singing with the bands.  I loved the smoky rooms, purply-blue lights, stage, audience, musicians.  The intensity of it all.  It’s a sexy thing, being the girl singer in a band.  Sometimes it got a bit dangerous, a fight would break out in the audience or some other weirdness.  I remember ducking behind a bar in Keansburg,New   Jersey, to wait out a bar brawl.   Many of those experiences appeared years later on the page when I turned to writing.  I suppose it was a way of re-living those wild times.   

Adam Robinson of Chapbook Genius reminded us that “Chapbooks are supposed to be FUN” and gave us some great examples of this medium.

Our own Jim Harrington brought us Back to Basics by attempting (once again) to Define the Undefinable.  What is flash fiction?  He shared an apt description from Randall Brown, that it is “a very tiny thing that doesn’t want to be anything else”. 

Looking for a press that fits your particular style?  J.A. Tyler of Mud Luscious Press shared their “Nephews” style of chapbooks that, well, you’d better click HERE to see for yourself…

Michael Salesses is all about Writing with Restraint.  His latest book I’m Not Saying, I’m Just Saying utilizes the best of flash fiction craft, which he relates to everything being important because the form is so concise.

Reading has everything to do with writing, and Creative Writing Mentor Abha Iyengar has lots of practical tips for jumping in (and a few for sending yourself long messages while traveling.  Check it out.  It’s worth it.)

Finally, everybody likes the idea of a book trailer, but only Mark Budman can show how it’s done.  Don’t miss his Key Points in this interactive article that will have you crafting your own commercials in no time!

I hope you enjoyed the month of March as much as I did, and found a little inspiration on the pages of Flash Fiction Chronicles.  Visit these authors and learn from fellow artists to continually hone your craft.

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Karen Nelson is the Technical Editor for Flash Fiction Chronicles, and also works as Curriculum Coordinator for Goldminds Publishing.  Her writing can be found in numerous niche magazines and educational curriculum, as well as via her blog (kbnelson.wordpress.com).  She homeschools her two children at their Ozarks hobby farm, where they look forward to every day bringing fresh eggs and fresh ideas!

 

String-of-10 FIVECONGRATULATIONS go out to LINDA SIMONI-WASTILA whose story, “After the Tsunami” has been selected by Guest Judge Kathy Fish as the FIRST PLACE WINNER of the String-of-10 Five Flash Fiction Contest.

 

After the Tsunami” will be published in April at Every Day Fiction.    “A Gauze, A Medical Dressing, A Scrim” by Robert Vaughan and “Before the Fireworks” by Folly Blaine have placed Second and Third respectively and will be published in April at Flash Fiction Chronicles.  (Exact publications dates to be arranged.) The Honorable Mentions and Finalists will not be published by Every Day Fiction nor by Flash Fiction Chronicles, but we are positive they will find a home for their wonderful work in short order.

You’ll find a complete list of Winners and Finalists (in alphabetical order) plus an interview with Kathy Fish below.

 

 Top Three Winners

1st Place  ”After The Tsunami” by Linda Simoni-Wastila

2nd Place  ”A Gauze, A Medical Dressing, A Scrim” by Robert Vaughan

3rd Place  ”Before the Fireworks” by Folly Blaine

 

Patricia McFarland Memorial Prize

Most effective incorporation of the theme of freedom

“Jump” by Stephen Ramey

 

Honorable Mention

“Crow Party” by Susan Gabrielle

“Invincible” by Victoria Bond

“Jump” by Stephen Ramey

“Quantum Kiss” by Kieran Marsh

 

Finalists

“Beautiful Stranger” by Tamara Walsh

“Can’t Be Sad with Geese” by Michelle Donahue

“Cast Away” by Jillian Schmidt

“How We Became Friends” by Preston Randall

“In the Evening, a Star Reflects” by Isabella Grabski

“Infinite” by Nu Yang

“Phantom Springs Cave” by John C. Mannone

“Quarry Boys” by Lee Sang

“Remembered One” by Alexis Hunter

“The Connoisseur” by Erik Goranson

“The Quarry” by Annie Noblin

“The Quarry” by Elizabeth Coleman

“The Wall” by Jennifer Ruth Jackson

“They Were Not a Birthday Present” by Alexandra Mendelsohn

Congratulations to all who entered the String-of-10 FIVE Flash Fiction Contest.

We received over 200 entries this year!

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Kathy FishInterview with Guest Judge Kathy Fish

by Gay Degani

We at Flash Fiction Chronicles are honored to have flash fiction pioneer, Kathy Fish, as our guest judge this year. Kathy’s short fiction has appeared in Indiana Review, The Denver Quarterly, New South, Quick Fiction, Guernica, Slice and elsewhere. She was the guest editor of Dzanc Books’ Best of the Web 2010.  She is the author of three collections of short fiction: a chapbook of flash fiction in the chapbook collective, A Peculiar Feeling of Restlessness: Four Chapbooks of Short Short Fiction by Four Women (Rose Metal Press, 2008), Wild Life (Matter Press, 2011) and Together We Can Bury It, the 2nd printing of which is forthcoming from The Lit Pub.

 

Gay Degani: What do you look for when you are judging a contest?

Kathy Fish: On first read, it’s just smooth prose and a lack of anything cliched or hackneyed or pat. Those stories make it to the second pass. Then I get a little pickier. What I’m looking for is something that stands out in terms of beautiful writing, a great story, originality, etc.

GD: How aware were you as you read  that the entries came from a specific prompt?  How did working from the same prompt affect the originality of the pieces? Or did they?

KF: I knew ahead of time there were prompt words. I didn’t pay much attention to what the prompt words were, but it becomes clear, especially in such short pieces, the words that are repeated. I know that “grave” as a prompt word resulted in graveyard stories, ghost stories and so forth. Anytime there is a grouping of prompt words it forms something subconscious in the writer’s brain I think. “Grave”, “rose” and “evening” –those words lend themselves so easily to the dark and the gothic sort of tales. There was some similarity in tone through the stories.

GD: What was it about the winning story that made you decide, “This is it?”

KF: First of all, it’s gorgeously written. And I admired the scope of it, how it took on this huge event, and made it so deeply personal. In the space of a mere 250 words the writer took on cataclysm, culture, and personal tragedy, weaving these all together seamlessly and gracefully. The story made me feel and think. It stayed with me. I pretty much knew on first read this one would be in the top 3.

GD: Do you have any lines or segments or characters that stood out for you in the top three stories? And why?

KF: “After The Tsunami” by Linda Simoni-Wastila was such a standout for me in all ways. The prose was precise and beautiful and I felt great care was taken in conveying the character. Past and present are intricately woven. As a flash it felt cinematic, epic, full of story and emotional depth. I could go on and on.

The playfulness of approach and language and weirdness of Robert Vaughan’s “A Gauze, A Medical Dressing, A Scrim” just thrilled me. I loved the sound of this piece. Things like: “pulley-pails through the laundry drop”. I love that! This one just got progressively weirder. Like a collaboration between Wes Anderson and David Lynch.

What I admired about Folly Blaine’s “Before the Fireworks” was how simply she allowed the scene to unfold. The prose is clear and uncluttered. Blaine gives us a gentle exchange between two characters, co-workers and friends, and the small kindnesses they show each other, in a quiet moment on the cusp of big change for one of them. This story could so easily have been overplayed but it wasn’t.

GD: What should writers consider when entering a contest similar to this?  What strategies would you suggest?

KF: I’m not sure about strategies. I think it’s all about submitting the best story you can write. I would say though in a case where all the entrants are working with the same set of words it might be an advantage to go against your first inclination, which may also be everyone else’s first inclination. So maybe consider using the word “grave” as an adjective, or the word “quarry” as a verb and so forth. Going against expectation.

GD: What are you currently working on?

KF: I’m writing short stories (not flash) these days and really loving it. I’m just this week sending out my first full-length short story in a very long time.  Feels good.

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Gay DeganiGay Degani has published on-line and in print including each of The Best of Every Day Fiction editions (fourth forthcoming) and her own collection, Pomegranate Stories.   She is the retiring founder-editor of EDF’s Flash Fiction Chronicles, a staff editor at Smokelong Quarterly, and blogs at Words in Place where a list of her online and print fiction can be found.   Nominated twice for a Pushcart, her story, “Something about L.A,” won the 11th Annual Glass Woman Prize and placed 23rd out of 7000 entries  with “Mischief” in 13th Annual Writer’s Digest Short Short Story Competition.   It will be published in a special competition collection.

 by Gay Degani
Scroll down for Monthly Miscellany
Gay Degani
Life is a crossword puzzle done in ink.No matter the effort, I still mess up.  Thank goodness, I am not alone in this human flaw.   I put in the “perfect” answer with confidence until I run out of squares.  Why didn’t I count before I brandished my pen?

So I apply White-Out. Now I can’t read the numbers on the grid.  I squint, I use my nail to scrape, dig in the basket on the breakfast table for the magnifying glass.  I look at the numbers around the “unreadable” number and deduce.  Oh yes it’s number 4 or 7 or 9, isn’t it? Why don’t I just take my time?  Make sure everything fits before I go for it?  Sometimes I just don’t.  I want to “go.”  The trick is once I decide to go and it doesn’t work, I have to “let go” and get on with it.

This is how I feel when I write, too, that organic unwieldy process. Get an idea and dive in, feet first, an adventure that could lead me just about anywhere.  Let’s go.  Bombs away.  Then I realize I’ve gone on a tangent.  I look around for the white out, but there isn’t any for this particular kind of puzzle.  What I’ve got in front of me is a mess that doesn’t make much sense.  I highlight those 1000 or so words and let my finger hover over the “Delete” key. But wait, I don’t tear up a crossword puzzle when I screw it up, do I?  I reread, rethink, reconstruct and review.  And that’s what needs to be done with the story too, but this is hard.

There are things I understand about the revision process after years of trying to learn to write well, but sometimes knowing something intellectually doesn’t always translate into using the tools you should.  I’ve written articles, here in fact, about questioning the text, asking yourself what does your character want, what stands in her way, what does she do about it, and how is it resolved. But sometimes I cannot see through the jumble of words on the page.  I can’t let go of what came out of my brain the first time.  But I need to.  This is important.  I need to.

I need to push away from myself and search through my own writing as if I were someone else. And when those “other” eyes reveal that “the story doesn’t work,” “the story doesn’t satisfy,” “the character takes no action,” “there is no change,” “there is no meaning,” then I need to let go of the piece as it is and be willing to challenge the story in whatever way that  joggles me into better understanding its structure, its characters, its emotion, its theme.

First, it’s hard because there are often many things I love about what I’ve just put on paper, a turn of phrase, a character who is funny, a scene that really seems to work, but taken as a whole?  It has no meaning.  Sometimes it is easy to get rid of the mess.  That’s why they put trash cans on your computer screen, right?  Second, it kind of makes sense, doesn’t it?  The story I just whizzed through?  My subconscious  is more creative and original than the left-brained me, isn’t it?  Third,  there’s so much fun in that initial rush of words, I just wanna do that again. But I can’t  let any of this stand in my way because the reality is first drafts aren’t perfect.  I have to let go of that idea–and the idea that writing could be easy.

I have to realize that my  mess-up isn’t a mess-up.  It’s a search.  It’s like filling in a word in a crossword puzzle that turns out to be wrong.  Do I leave the incorrect answer there because it “fits?”   It looks right?  Am I really too lazy to change it?  Does that help me to complete the puzzle or does it lead me astray? I know that I must let go of first words and first thoughts and use the tools of craft to help me work toward a piece of art.

String-of-10 FIVE is LIVE

For the week of February 3 through February 9, Flash Fiction Ch

ronicles is having its Fifth String-of-10 Contest—String-of-10 FIVE—for the best 250-word story written from a randomly selected string of ten words.  GUIDELINES

 STRING-OF-10 FIVE PROMPT:

EVENING-QUARRY-ACCENT-ROSE-TEAR-MINUTE-GRAVE-CLOSE-ENTRANCE-BOW 

I want to put a ding in the universe. –Steve Jobs 

STRING-OF-10 FIVE GUEST JUDGE: KATHY FISH

I am pleased to announce that this year’s Guest Judge will be Kathy Fish.  Kathy Fish’s short fiction has appeared in Indiana Review, The Denver Quarterly, New South, Quick Fiction, Guernica, Slice and elsewhere. She was the guest editor of Dzanc Books’ Best of the Web 2010. She is the author of three collections of stories: a chapbook of flash fiction in the chapbook collective, A Peculiar Feeling of Restlessness: Four Chapbooks of Short Short Fiction by Four Women, (Rose Metal Press, 2008),  Wild Life (Matter Press, 2011) and Together We Can Bury It, forthcoming from The Lit Pub.

Coming this month:

Flash Fiction Chronicles Series of Creating and Publishing Fiction Chapbooks From Bonnie ZoBell:

Victor David Giron at Curbside Splendor, February 7Tammy Lynne Stoner at Gertrude Press, February 21

Every Day Fiction’s Top Author Interview

Aliza Greenblatt will be interviewing Kevin McNeil whose story “The Merry Jester” was the top story for January at EDF.

 

String-of-10 FIVE Flash Fiction Contest is sponsored by Flash Fiction Chronicles.

It begins February 3 at 12:01 PST

For the week of February 3 through February 9, Flash Fiction Chronicles is having its Fifth String-of-10 Contest—String-of-10 FIVE—for the best 250-word story written from a randomly selected string of ten words.

For String-of-10 Five contest only!

IF YOU HAVE TROUBLE WITH THE SUBMITTABLE FORM PLEASE SEND YOUR ENTRY TO gaydegani@yahoo.com WITH “STRING-OF-10 5 ENTRY” IN THE SUBJECT LINE.

 

STRING-OF-10 FIVE PROMPT:

EVENING-QUARRY-ACCENT-ROSE-TEAR-MINUTE-GRAVE-CLOSE-ENTRANCE-BOW 

 

I want to put a ding in the universe. –Steve Jobs 

 

 

GUEST JUDGE: KATHY FISH

I am pleased to announce that this year’s Guest Judge will be Kathy Fish.  Kathy Fish’s short fiction has appeared in Indiana Review, The Denver Quarterly, New South, Quick Fiction, Guernica, Slice and elsewhere. She was the guest editor of Dzanc Books’ Best of the Web 2010. She is the author of three collections of stories: a chapbook of flash fiction in the chapbook collective, A Peculiar Feeling of Restlessness: Four Chapbooks of Short Short Fiction by Four Women, (Rose Metal Press, 2008),  Wild Life (Matter Press, 2011) and Together We Can Bury It, forthcoming from The Lit Pub.

 

The guidelines of this year’s contest are listed below.   The contest is open for one week only.  All entries must be submitted through our Submission Manager.  There will be no other prompt words for this week while the contest is running.  Regular daily prompts will begin again next Sunday.

GUIDELINES

  1. The prompt for String-of-10 FIVE will be available at 12:01 on Sunday, February 3, 2013 here at FFC.
  2. There is no entry fee.
  3. Submit stories up to 250 words. Title is not counted int the 25o words.
  4. Enter up to two stories per author.
  5. All stories must contain at least four words from the String-of-10.
  6. You can use any tense of the words and any recognizable form.  For example, if the word  is “jar,” “Jargon” would not qualify while “jar-like” chin would.
  7. You can use a prompt word in the title.
  8. Seamless integration of any four of the prompt words is the goal.
  9. The quotation is given for thematic inspiration.  Using the theme of  ”if one makes a ding in the universe, such and such will happen” is not necessary to win.  However, this year we will give out *a special prize for the story that best  incorporates the theme,  The Patricia McFarland Memorial prize. First, second, and third place winners are eligible to also win this prize, but any story that is submitted that best uses this theme may win.
  10. Entries must be received by 11:59 PST Saturday, February 9.
  11. Winners will be notified sometime in March 2013.  Publications will follow in April.
  12. All decisions made by the FFC staff and our guest judge are final.
  13. Submit all entries here: SUBMIT TO STRING-OF-10 FIVE

 

For String-of-10 Five contest only!

IF YOU HAVE TROUBLE WITH THE SUBMITTABLE FORM PLEASE SEND YOUR ENTRY TO gaydegani@yahoo.com WITH “STRING-OF-10 5 ENTRY” IN THE SUBJECT LINE.

PRIZES STRING-OF-TEN FIVE FLASH FICTION CONTEST

1st Place: Winner will have his or her story published at Every Day Fiction in April, 2013 and be paid the standard payment of $3.00 per story.  A $50  Cash Prize from Flash Fiction Chronicles will go to the first place winner. A choice from Every Day Publishing Book List along with a copy of Pomegranate Stories by Gay Deganieditor of Flash Fiction Chronicles, will also be awarded as well as an “I Write Every Day” t-shirt. As a special bonus this year, Kathy Fish, our guest judge, is awarding an autographed copy of  her collection Together We Can Bury It.

2nd Place: Winner will have his or her story published at Flash Fiction Chronicles in April. (There is no payment for publication at Flash Fiction Chronicles). A $20.00 cash prize will be awarded as well as a copy of Pomegranate Stories by Gay Degani, the editor of Flash Fiction Chronicles. A special bonus this year, Kathy Fish, our guest judge, is awarding  an autographed copy of her collection Wild Life.

3rd Place: Winner will have his or her story published at Flash Fiction Chronicles in April(There is no payment for publication at Flash Fiction Chronicles). A $20.00 cash prize will be awarded as well as a copy of Pomegranate Stories by Gay Degani, the editor of Flash Fiction Chronicles.

The Patricia McFarland Memorial Prize: Winner will have his or her story published at Flash Fiction Chronicles in April.  (There is no payment for publication at Flash Fiction Chronicles) and a cash prize of $25.00

All four winners will be interviewed at Flash Fiction Chronicles.

 

Stories from the fourth String-of-10 Contest

1st Place—When Elliot Let Go by Troy Farah

2nd Place—Dutch Boy by Len Kuntz

3rd Place—Nothing Left to Lose by Andrew Stancek

Stories from the third String-of-10 Contest

1st Place—Pretending by A. S. Andrews

2nd Place—Today She Will Write Cool Things by Romit Berger

3rd Place—Wingless by Karolyn Reddy

 Stories from the second String-of-10 Contest

1st Place—Salvation by Ann Pino

2nd Place—Gypsy Flour by John Towler

3rd Place—Good Morning Susan by Brittany Soder

 Stories from the first String-of-10 Contest

1st Place—The Haircut by Sharon E. Trotter

2nd PlaceThe Forever Summer by Mary J. Daley

3rd Place—Choices Made by Jim O’Loughlin

 

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NOTE: Jim Harrington’s Market updates which usually appear on Sundays will begin again next week.